Motivation and Marketing Optimization [video]

The video above provides a short summary of the book Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us, written by Daniel Pink. The insights shared can be used both to understand how to provide the best online experience to your visitors and to keep your Web Analysts happy on your company.

Website Experience and Motivation

As the presenter says: "We are not as endlessly manipulable & predictable as you would think!" And this lesson should be in the back of the mind of every Web Analyst. Analysts are endlessly tweaking websites and trying to understand what will persuade website visitors to buying something.

However, it is very important to always be aware that sometimes human behavior is just not predictable and rational as we tend to believe. This subject (non rationality in decision making) was a central factor on the research conducted by Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky, for which they won the Nobel Prize in Economics (read more about the Prospect Theory)

Web Analytics and Motivation

A question that is constantly asked by website managers nowadays is "how do I keep my Web Analysts in the company and how should I reward them?" In the presentation above, we learn that "performance is not only about money." In fact, Dan Pink recommends the following rule: "Pay people enough to take the issue of money of the table, pay people enough so that they are not thinking about the money and they think about work."

When it comes to remuneration, 3 factors lead to better performance & personal satisfaction:

  1. Autonomy: workers that are self directed, that run their own lives, are more engaged in the work place, so just get out of their ways and let them be innovative!
  2. Mastery: the urge to get better at stuff motivates people to work (closely related to what June Dershewitz writes about the drive to develop a Web Analytics career)
  3. Purpose: when the company has a purpose workers come to work with a better feeling and it ultimately also brings better talent.
Online Behavior © 2012